• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Deadly Unna Essay Conclusion Tips

Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay

FAQ   Search forums   Register   Login

AuthorMessage
Habeebro



Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 6

Posted: 11 Aug 15 (0:51)    Post subject: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay

Describe an important change that happened in the text. Explain how this change helped you understand the main idea

Change is something that society can be challenged with everyday, be it for the collective worse or for the better of humanity. It can occur on an individual, collective and global scale. Phillip Gwynne’s novel, ‘Deadly, Unna?’ exhibits a change that the protagonist, Gary ‘Blacky’ Black goes through, in the way that he matures and begins to comprehend things he did not before. Through this change, he begins to realise and loathe the racism the town encourages and practices towards the local aborigines and also he begins to appreciate that outward appearances do not always represent truthful, inward reality and starts to be more brave in opposing this nepotism and racial prejudice.

Gary ‘Blacky’ Black is the narrator of the story and the main character who changes the most out of the town. He initially begins judging people on first impressions and physical appearance but as he matures throughout the course of the story, he learns not to be so hasty to judge, as he realises not only do people grow and change, much like himself, but outward appearances can be deceptive. Gary originally has low self-esteem and does not have very much confidence in his abilities, however, as he begins to mature,he inaugurates to be braver in the ways he carries himself, which can be something readers can relate to. He also starts to look between the lines of his town and see that they are hurtful towards the aborigines or “Nungas”, which he wishes to change.

Blacky’s change from being naive to maturity and being able to be aware of the subtlety around him is important because he becomes more independent and righteous with him standing up for what is right, as opposed to how he started off when he was content with his friends casual and overt racism. An example of this is when when he is in the pub with all the men and Big Mac tells a racist joke saying “ "Did ya hear about the one about the boong and the priest?" and then tells the racist joke. Blacky narrates “I didn’t even laugh. He had told that joke a while ago and I had laughed at it, but now it just wasn’t funny”. This shows that Blacky is now able to not only recognise wrongdoing but respond to it emphatically, despite when he used to be racist or tolerant of racism. His change and developing maturity allowed him to understand that people are people, and a joke against someone of another race, is not funny. This concept is relatable to our world as we too do not have to join in on racist jokes or ideologies and we can choose what we think is right so we, like Blacky, can be morally upright individuals.

Another reason why Gary’s change is significant is that his developing maturity allows him to not only see the racism in his town, opposite to where he couldn’t at the beginning of the book, but also tries to change it. This shows he can be mature and brave, even in a bigoted town. An example of where he became aware that the town was racist was when Mark Arks was awarded the Best On Ground trophy at the awards night, instead of Dumby Red,a ‘Nunga’, who was clearly the star player.Blacky expresses “Mark Arks getting B.O.G. It’s bullshit. That’s Dumby’s trophy.” We as readers realise he has figured out that his town is racist and he is quite upset about it. He then proceeds to ‘dob’ his own trophy he had received at the ceremony, away exclaiming, “Yous can stick your footy, you lousy bastards”. This presents that Gary is aware of the racial prejudice in his town and is willing to give up footy to allow for racial equality. This is relevant to us as readers, as it shows we should treat everyone as human beings, rather than judging based on their skin colour or physical appearance as is the collective today.

One more reason that Gary’s change to maturity is exigent is that it allows us to see that once he becomes abstract minded, he is able to challenge racism with a sense of urgency and courage much easier than he ever could have when he was naive. An event when this is alluded to us is when Gary is about to painted over a racial slur on a wall in the town that says “BOONGS PISS OFF”. He lacks the paint to do so, so he decides to purloin it from his father.However, he is caught in the act and openly explains what he is going to do with it, in which his father reacts explicitly yelling “Are you ... out of your mind?!” This shows the mentality of an individual in the town, who wants to further practice racism, completely opposite of what Gary wants to do. Gary and his father are contrasted here to display the different mindsets that the two have, and that Gary is able to be more morally upright than an adult. After being told to put the paint back, Gary is able to reply “I can’t put it back”. The ability of being able to stand up to his father is representative of the progression that Gary has gone through, and Gwynne uses it to portray his bravery and true intent of ending racism in his town. These qualities that Gary displays can be relevant in our world in that, when we do what’s right, we will be able to brave and nothing will stop us. The racism that is still in our world can be challenged by what Gary shows to us as readers, and we too can pursue this, so long as we know what is right.

So, Gary Black going through that change of naivety to maturity shows how we can mature as a person to become a morally upright person. We can also be independent with our choices and be brave enough to stand up to racism. It shows us as readers what maturity is: Making our own choices for the right way rather than the wrong.

Need some feedback on this Exams are next week
 Topic: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay
englishteacher
Expert Teacher



Joined: 05 Oct 2005
Posts: 3179

Posted: 11 Aug 15 (20:45)    Post subject:

Kia ora Habeebro

Welcome to studyit. It is great that you have found us before your mocks.

Looking at your essay now. Feedback is attached.

Well done, off to a great start.

ET
 Topic: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay
Habeebro



Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 6

 Topic: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay
englishteacher
Expert Teacher



Joined: 05 Oct 2005
Posts: 3179

Posted: 14 Aug 15 (12:50)    Post subject:

Kia ora Habeebro

Fantastic - good luck and let us know how you get on.

ET
 Topic: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay
Habeebro



Joined: 11 Aug 2015
Posts: 6

 Topic: Deadly, Unna? Novel Essay
Page 1 of 1



Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005, 2008 phpBB Group

Australian rules is set in a small rural town, where the relationships between the white townspeople and the Aboriginal people on the mission are complex, conflicted and marred by deeply entrenched racism. The local football team in many ways serves to represent the town, it reflects the conflicted relationship between the white people and the Aboriginal people- we begin to understand this as the film unfolds. Other themes inherent in the film are themes of family, love, loyalty and violence- the secrecy of domestic violence and the more overt forms of racial violence that spill out onto the public spheres of the football field and the pub.

The opening narration informs us that half the football team is Aboriginal and that there would not be a football team without the Aboriginal players, therefore we understand how the town team relies on the talent and number of the Aboriginal players. We then witness the contradiction of the white and Aboriginal boys playing side by side as team members followed by the social segregation between the members after the match. This segregation is highlighted by Blacky (a white boy from town) and Dumby (an Aboriginal boy who is the best player on the team) whose friendship transcends these borders and we also witness ways that this segregation between the white teenager and Aboriginal teenagers is culturally imposed by certain adults.

In one of the beginning scenes, just after a football match, Dumby and Blacky want to ‘hang out’ together, but Dumby is taken back to the mission by an older friend and Blacky cannot follow. Blacky, Clarence and Dumby all call out to each other ‘Nukkin ya’ and this use of Aboriginal language between two Aboriginal teenagers and Blacky the white boy signifies the level of their friendship and mutual

acceptance. Pickles’ comment to Blacky that ‘now he even talks like one’, symbolises the town’s disapproval of such respect for Aboriginal culture and Aboriginal people.

The character of Pretty, Dumby’s older friend from the mission, plays an important role in the film. He was once a talented football player himself but no longer ‘kicks goals for whitefellas’ and he is significant because he is the main character to verbalise that Aboriginal people are treated differently and unfairly. He is somewhat aggressive in his approach, expressing bitterness and resentment, yet it is implied that his approach is reactionary to the way he has been treated, and his statementsoverlooked by the white coach- are significant examples of changing responses to uneven power dynamics.

For example the white coach tells Dumby to make sure all the Aboriginal team players turn up to the next match and Pretty interjects stating that it doesn’t work that way anymore, his metaphor of ‘yes sir, no sir, three bags full sir’, clearly refers to the history of Aboriginal people being used as servants and points out that the coach’s approach of ordering Dumby around is no longer appropriate. Unfortunately the coach does not take this message on and rather than acknowledging the Aboriginal boys as talented, valuable and indeed essential team players, he nervously treats them as unreliable boys who may destroy the team’s chances by not turning up.

This attitude of relying on Aboriginal talent, whilst refusing to appropriately acknowledge this talent is made explicitly clear during the award giving ceremony that takes place after the team win the finals. Pretty is made to leave the ceremony after he disputes the truth of a speech about the egalitarian nature of football ‘where

you can be anyone, from anywhere, and receive the recognition you deserve’. Pretty is immediately proved to be right when the awards are given only to white boys, and Dumby, who is obviously the most talented player on the team is left completely unacknowledged. There is a direct shift in Dumby’s response and he becomes more like Pretty, demonstrating anger and resentment, rather than his normal cheerful, co operative self. This gives us insight into Pretty’s character and how he may have developed the attitude that he has towards white people. Pretty and Dumby’s break-in to the pub that very night can be interpreted as a direct response to the unfairness of the award ceremony- although there are characters, such as the coach, who are not willing to see the connection. The fact that Dumby is then murdered by Blacky’s father is a complicated event with many layers of meaning. The insights we have been given about Blacky’s father prior to the shooting is that of a man who dominates his family, puts down his sons for showing vulnerability and who physically abuses his wife. There are instances in which we can see links between the violence he demonstrates towards his family and the verbal and physical violence he feels justified in displaying towards Dumby, and then later towards Dumby’s sister, Clarence. There is a scene in which the father physically attacks Blacky and forces Blacky to declare loyalty to him (regarding the shooting), meanwhile verbally abusing Clarence with racial slurs and ordering her to get out of his house. During this scene the camera pans onto the faces of the Blacky’s mother and siblings and we see how domestic and racial violence become enmeshed, that the father’s attack on Blacky for being with Clarence is an act of violence that hurts his whole family. Interestingly it is Clarence who is the least cowed in this scene, she does not show fear and walks out

with dignity. In this way we can see how control and domination is a particular pattern in this family, but is not taken on by Clarence.

In many ways, the shooting, and the following events, are catalysts for great changes, both in the town, and more specifically in Blacky’s family. Blacky rejects his parent’s demands to maintain loyalty to his father and instead Blacky remains loyal to his friendship with Dumby. Blacky’s rejection of his father’s authority instigates other members of the family, such as his mother and next youngest brother who subtly take Blacky’s side. The scene where his brother urges him to get up and face his father, (when his father beat him to the ground), symbolises the request of his family for Blacky to represent them all and challenge the father’s authority. The resolution of the film sees the father gone, leaving Clarence and Blacky happily together but planning to this town ‘that has nothing for them’. The fate of the town is not so happy, the boys from the mission won’t come to town and there is no longer a football team.

In many ways we can see how Australian rules reflects the complexities of human relationships- of love and loyalty and hatred and violence, and clearly demonstrates how deeply entrenched racism hurts everyone. The town, through its racism has destroyed the tentative trust of the Aboriginal people and has lost its ‘glory’- its winning football team. Its seems empty, a place only good for leaving.

One thought on “Deadly Unna Essay Conclusion Tips

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *